Finally we arrived in Denmark where we would be for three days with no particular plans except to eat our fill of pastries. As it turned out, we had far more fun than we expected. 
Our Ferienwohnung (vacation rental home) was on a real farm, about a mile outside the town but seemingly way out in the country.

Our vacation "cottage"

Our vacation “cottage”

It is owned by an 80 year old widower, a former baker in town. In addition to a few chickens and a most friendly little dog, he had six Icelandic horses that he rides and rents out to riders. One evening he and Suzi rode horses into the countryside for a couple of hours and had a great time together. Suzi is a fairly experienced rider and was familiar with these horses and their special fifth gait tolt from her time in Iceland a few years ago.

Time to ride Icelandic horses

Time to ride Icelandic horses

Suzi with saddle after the ride to a dike

Suzi with saddle after the ride to a dike

Our old but spacious quarters were in one end of the old cow barn but also attached to the thatch roofed house.

Our modest entry at the end of the old cow barn. Note how low the doors are.

Our modest entry at the end of the old cow barn. Note how low the doors are.

Because of the great weather we were having, we were served breakfast the first morning outside in the courtyard by the barn near the horses.

80 year old Mr. Jacobsen serves us breakfast

80 year old Mr. Jacobsen serves us breakfast

Our delightful breakfast place by the barn

Our delightful breakfast place by the barn

Other meals we fixed ourselves in our tiny kitchen. We asked about fresh eggs and Mr. Johansen gave us six eggs right away, which we scrambled for dinner, mixed with the most heavenly but super stinky cheese we had been carrying around for several hot days. The fridge was well stocked with cold beer with a sign “free” on the shelf. Two baskets were filled with fresh fruit.

Free beer

Free beer

Friendly dog lsways turns outward for petting

Friendly dog lsways turns outward for petting

Coleslaw a la Wild West. Really?

Coleslaw a la Wild West. Really?

Modest supper of local products incl. Danish stinky cheese and butter

Modest supper of local products incl. Danish stinky cheese and butter

The town itself is a jewel.

The cathedral from 1220

The cathedral from 1220

Typical Danish street scene

Typical Danish street scene

We lost no time in getting to the center of Ribe to wander the narrow, crooked lanes.

Most everything leans a bit

Most everything leans a bit

Roses doing well

Roses doing well

Interesting doorway

Interesting doorway

Flowers doing well in all the streets

Flowers doing well in all the streets

Yet another door

Yet another door

By 9:00 the time had come for dinner. We had great trouble finding a Danish restaurant and settled on one of numerous pizza parlors. The pizza was as good as you would want.

Pizza parlor - American style (that's what the sign said)

Pizza parlor – American style (that’s what the sign said)

Yum, yum pizza

Yum, yum pizza

The sun set around 9:30 and darkness hardly fell by 11:00. Here’s a photo of one of the curious horses looking in our window at 11:00 as we were turning in.

Curious horse checking us out at nearly 11pm

Curious horse checking us out at nearly 11pm

The moon beamed into our room from the south.

Great mood in our room

Great mood in our room

Although not fully dark throughout the night, dawn began to show by 3:30 in the morning. 

It seemed to us that the town was filled mostly with Danish tourists, with a good sprinkling of Germans. We never once heard English on the street. In fact, we think we have heard English only once on the entire trip, in Munich where we might well expect to see American visitors looking for the best beer anywhere.

Our original plan was to stay only a single night here, then visit Suzi’s friend in a town to the north, but friend was presently in Sweden, so we stayed in Ribe another two nights, with no regrets.

Full day number one found us on the sandy island of Romo for the whole day. The fine, sandy beach was so inviting we spent lots of time frolicking in the surf. We could drive to the surf’s edge, so many people did and set up camp for the day.

Romo's wonderful beach with warm water and powder fine sand

Romo’s wonderful beach with warm water and powder fine sand

Even I went in and horsed around

Even I went in and horsed around

Foam battles ensued

Foam battles ensued

Later in the day when the tide was out, we drove to the southern end of this round island to experience walking in the mudflats. Walking in the Wattenmeer was a specific goal of Eva’s, a desire since childhood. Squishy, warm mud enveloped our feet for a unique experience. 

A slog through Wattenmeer mud

A slog through Wattenmeer mud

Next day we visited yet another round island, M, with quite a different personality. We could drive there only at low tide. After walking over seemingly endless sand dunes, we didn’t quite make it to the huge sandy beach, separated by a body of flowing water that stopped me and Eva, but didn’t deter intrepid Suzi.
On our final morning we did a wrap-up visit downtown to spend our final Kroners. Denmark does not use the Euro. With our final 40 cents we could not even buy the cheapest pastry, priced at 50 cents. But Suzi turned on her charm and snared it for us. 

Pastry selection seemed endless

Pastry selection seemed endless

In the end, we were not especially turned on by present day Danish pastries. They do not seem to meet the high standards I remember from the past. Today the Danes seem to prefer pizza – with all the consequences.

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