Maine has the longest coastline of any state in the U.S.and now that I’ve been there I can understand. The massive glacier of 10,000 years ago ground down everything that was unlucky enough to find itself under a two mile depth of ice. When the glacier retreated it left a whole mess of islands and a really stringy bunch of “necks” that defined the coastline of Maine. And of course all the topsoil was kaput. So if you go walking in the woods you are walking on granite or roots for the most part. Wild blueberries think this is great. If nothing else is filling up the space then blueberry barrens just love to come in.

Blueberry barrens turning red

Blueberry barrens turning red

We were in time to find the last of the season’s blueberries still on the low growing bushes. They tasted like the real thing.

Blueberry bush against granite bedrock

Blueberry bush against granite bedrock

Maine has lots of islands, therefore it has lots of bridges. This is one we took to get onto Deer Isle, on the southern tip of which is located the quaint fishing village of Stonington.

Bridge to Deer Isle

Bridge to Deer Isle

Stonington harbor

Stonington Harbor

A few of the wharves

A few of the wharves

Somehow we spent the very first hour mesmerized while watching lobster boats unloading their hauls. This is big time business here, as it is all along the Maine coast.

Lobster traps

Lobster traps

Downtown Stonington

Downtown Stonington

After lunch in a real down-home cafe, we wandered the few streets of the town, admiring houses dating back a hundred years or more.

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Even the public library had a charming reading room overlooking the harbor.

Public library upstairs reading room

Public library upstairs reading room

For quite a while Stonington was known for its granite quarries. Proximity to the sea allowed inexpensive shipping of stone to distant ports around the world. This granite was used extensively for public buildings in Washington, D.C. and in many state capital buildings. We took a look at one of the now abandoned sites.

To the quarries

To the quarries

Granite prized for its pink color

Granite prized for its pink color

Glacial polish of exposed rock

Glacial polish of exposed rock

Now we are off for far too short a visit to Acadia National Park on our way “down east” to the eastern-most reaches of the U.S.A.

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