Before moving on across the border into Canada for a brief spell, let’s finish looking around the vicinity of Lubec. There’s a lighthouse not so far away, on Quoddy Head. Here it is.

Quoddy Head lighthouse

Quoddy Head lighthouse

Lighthouse here since 1808

Lighthouse here since 1808

The easternmost point in the United States

The easternmost point in the United States

The lighthouse is now surrounded by a state park. That means trails, and we couldn’t resist taking one that led right to some vertical bluffs.

Oh, those lovely trails

Oh, those lovely trails

Eva in the lead

Eva in the lead

We were warned

We were warned

One of the bluffs

One of the bluffs

Color along the way

Color along the way

On the way home, at the town limit was an interesting cemetery, home to the bones of various sea captains among others.

Old town cemetery

Old town cemetery

Fine headstone

Fine headstone

We returned to our quarters late in the day when the tide was quite out. Being at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy, the tides were about 20 feet where we were.

Tide is out this evening, about 19 feet today.

Tide is out this evening, about 19 feet today.

We enjoyed another peaceful sunset before calling it a day.

From our deck

From our deck

Before setting off for a day on Campobello we enjoyed a good breakfast and view in the dining room.

Dining room of the attached restaurant

Dining room of the attached restaurant

Next stop after being grilled by a customs agent as to why we wanted to enter Canada was a very well appointed visitors center filled with brochures and maps and things. The young lady behind the counter spoke a rather distant kind of English we almost understood. I think her native tongue was French, or Acadian. We zipped on down the road a few kilometers to the “cottage” of the Roosevelts, who were among the earlier monied summer people here. It was the thing to do in the late 1800s. Franklin D. spent his youthful summers here, as well as a few limited times after he became President.

FDR lived here

FDR lived here

There was a great view across to America.

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We were right in time to enjoy tea and cookies redolent of those days gone by, and hear tales of Eleanor Roosevelt by knowledgable presenters.

Story time - about all things Eleanor

Story time – about all things Eleanor

There’s a lighthouse over here, too. We had to go take a look. It’s on a little island, isolated until low tide. We were half an hour early, and didn’t have the $10 each to be guided across and up to the top.

Canada's own

Canada’s own

Next morning Eva just had to go miles and miles out of the way to get right across the water from Lubec to visit Eastport. This kind of isolation was typical of the Maine coast, where you can see right across a bay but drive for miles to get there. No wonder the coastline is over 3000 miles long.

Eastport is quite charming, actually. Here’s a view of the downtown, with its many old brick buildings.

Town of Eastport

Town of Eastport

Eastport harbor

Eastport harbor

I particularly liked the town’s public library. They had been having a book sale for some time, but this day they were giving away all the remaining books for free. Normally I wouldn’t cast a glance over the mouldering remains but I did. My eyes hit upon something particularly interesting – a history of Germany in the early 19th century before it became a unified country in 1872, written by a noted scholar in the field. What a find. $32 new today on Amazon.

When directly across the channel is a foreign land, you never know but what a bronze cannon might come in handy.

When directly across the channel is a foreign land, you never know but what a bronze cannon might come in handy.

The reading room

The reading room

We have a long way to go, to the end of U.S. Route 1. Gotta go.

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