I moved a couple of days ago. I knew when I made arrangements last winter that my hosts had other guests coming in, so months ago I arranged for another vacation rental on Ockelützwarft for the remaining eight days. I was pleased that it worked out so well. Here are a few pictures of the inside

The living room

The living room

The kitchen

The kitchen

The bedroom (made up for one)

The bedroom (made up for one)

and the outside.

My home

Building on the right is my new home

Backyard Strandkorbe

Outdoor seating

brick

Bench and flowers

Ockelützwarft is about as far from Hanswarft to the NW as Ockenswarft is to the SE. Thus I had chosen the two closest Warften to the grocery store and the restaurants, easily reached within 10-15 minutes by foot. Now it will be fun to explore the other half of the Hallig more thoroughly.

Hard to walk barefoot on all these shells

Hard to walk barefoot on all these shells

The northwest corner of the Hallig

The northwest corner of the Hallig

My ship is coming in

My ship is coming in

Along the western dike

Along the western dike

Hardy souls only!

Camping for hardy souls only!

Ockelützwarft is also where the school is located — pre-school through middle school is taught here in a one-room facility.

The Hallig School

The Hallig School

I am now closest to the Kirchwarft, the Church Warft, with its picturesque and charming church.

The Kirchwarft

The Kirchwarft

The road leading to the Church follows a Priel which becomes quite a waterway around the Church. This road is not too busy, and if I am early and the first one to walk it in the morning, I can watch a bunch of ducklings greeting the new day on some clumps of grass that had broken off the sides of the Priel and looked like little islands. But they are extremely skittish, and even pulling out my camera is enough movement for them to jump off their perch and swim away.

The ducklings are waking up

The ducklings are waking up

The day has started

The day has started

The Church is a real gem. It dates from the years 1637 to 1642 and has seen and survived many storms and floods. It and the parsonage are the only buildings on this Warft. Various concerts and lectures, as well as a once-a-week community singing afternoon, are held in the parsonage.

The parsonage

The parsonage

The building material and much of the furnishings of the Church came from a church further to the southeast of Hooge that was drowned and destroyed during a violent storm in 1634. Here is a look inside.

Pews in the Frisian blue and white colors

Pews in the Frisian blue and white colors

The beautiful pulpit

The beautiful pulpit

One of the windows

One of the windows

The Church is surrounded by a beautifully kept cemetery. The bell tower is off to one side.

Church and cemetery

Church and cemetery

The Churchyard

The Churchyard

The bell tower

The bell tower

Visitors who come to the Hallig for the day are always taken to the Church in a carriage, where they are given a tour and a lecture.

A tour group visiting the Church

A tour group visiting the Church

It must be the most photographed building on the whole Hallig. And it is very photogenic indeed.

The Church under a dramatic sky

The Church under a dramatic sky

Evening light

Evening light

Close by is the little harbor, mostly used by residents’ or visitors’ sailboats.

The harbor

The harbor

This odd-looking building belongs to the yacht club, but visitors can walk up the steps and enjoy the view over the Hallig (and use the free restroom).

The clubhouse

The clubhouse

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I decided it was time to take part in the myriad of programs the Community offers. So the other day I went to the Movies. The film was Der Schimmelreiter, made in the 1970’s after a very well-known story by a famous German author. Since it was set along the North Sea coast, complete with dike issues, storms, and floods, it was apropos — and after the dramatic climax where our heroes drowned miserably in a flood, we were all happy to step back out into sunlight, a light breeze, and happy and peaceful birds.

Oyster catchers and young

Oyster catchers and young

Lingering evening light

Lingering evening light

The next night I went to the Theater. A group of would-be thespians selects one play each year and performs it once a week during the summer season. These comedies are given in Plattdeutsch, the old language still spoken in that area. I realized how many expressions and words were integrated into the language spoken in the area where I grew up, Hochdeutsch, so of course I was curious whether I would be able to follow the play. I had no trouble. And what a hoot it was! Hardly anybody really knows the lines, there is a lot of improvisation, the prompter prompts the players in a loud voice, and apparently one never knows what they might include from one week to the next. Fun was had by all.

On the way home, the sky was aglow with interesting colorful clouds. Out came the camera, and in order to steady it, I propped it up on a fence post, tilted it to get the angle just right — and zap! The electrical wires, installed to keep the sheep in their pasture, got me instead. I guess you have to have that experience first hand in order to know what it feels like.

But the sky was still lovely.

Sunset over the Hallig

Sunset over the Hallig

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